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How to Host Regular Parties to Reward Your Employees

Your employees work hard for you, day in and day out. Thinking about how to host regular parties to reward your employees may not be high on your list of priotrities - but as a manager, you’re already regularly letting your staff know how much their hard work means to you. While giving incentives, offering extra responsibility, and praising personal team members are all ways to show your employees that you appreciate their efforts, sometimes you have to take a step back and be a little more creative.

When it comes to the team as a whole, how do you celebrate their efforts and truly show how much they mean to your business? Hosting parties is a great way to tell employees they’ve done a great job and that it’s time to relax and enjoy and evening (or afternoon together). And while it might seem like a lot of work, with the tips below you can easily host regular parties that your employees will enjoy and appreciate.

Enlist party planning help

It’s natural to decide to plan a party for your staff and then feel overwhelmed by the responsibilities of every detail coming together. But keep in mind, you don’t have to do it all yourself. Ask a handful of team members for help planning a fun party and you’ll not only have less work, but you’ll get a better perspective of what everyone enjoys.

Instead of forming a “committee” that regularly plans your parties, try rotating planners. Choose a few key team members each time you want to throw an event, and ask for their help with specific tasks like choosing a theme, creating invitations, or booking catering and music. Your employees will appreciate feeling ownership of a new, fun task. By sharing the burden, you’ll get a lot more done - and by bringing fresh minds to the task for every party, you’ll always have a new, fun experience.

Set a (realistic) budget

Once you’ve thrown a great party for your staff, you’ll be more inclined to keep throwing events. But you’ll quickly learn that it’s easy to go over-budget when you have an eager team planning a party. With food and drink costs, rentals, events, and restaurant down time, it can quickly become an expensive endeavor (tweet this) .

To avoid blowing your budget, lay out specifics for the team that will help you plan: set separate budgets for food, drink, and entertainment, and check in regularly to make sure your team’s plan is falling within these parameters. In addition, you can think about ways to cut costs like trading food for time with a local event space.

Be inclusive

One of the trickiest things about planning events for restaurant staff is finding a time when everyone can attend. With long hours and a customer base that’s relying on you, you almost always need at least a small team on staff - so how do you plan a party where everyone feels like they’re part of the fun (tweet this)?

It seems counter-intuitive, but closing your business early for a staff event is a great way to build team camaraderie. This way, no one feels left out and everyone truly gets a break from work (at least for a few hours). To smooth things over with your customers, make sure you communicate the closure early and often, and across all your marketing channels - your web site, your social media channels and even your front door. And if you can, try to include a short explanation about how time together as a team helps your staff recharge and ultimately makes your restaurant a better place to for your customers.


When it’s finally party time, the name of the game is to celebrate and relax. Take a moment to thank your staff specifically for their hard work and remind them that the party is for them. And if it’s possible, try not to talk about the stresses of the job too much - there will be time during the workday to solve those problems. A true employee party lets the stars of your restaurant relax and enjoy each other’s company.

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